The student news site of West Chicago Community High School

Wildcat Chronicle

The student news site of West Chicago Community High School

Wildcat Chronicle

The student news site of West Chicago Community High School

Wildcat Chronicle

Distinguished Sites Banner
SUPPORT US
$600
$750
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of West Chicago Community High School. Your contribution will help us cover our annual website hosting costs. We appreciate your support!

INSTAGRAM FEED

‘Karma’ is a what?

Jojo Siwa’s latest single leaves listeners questioning the artist’s recent behavior.
Students+watch+the+perplexing+Jojo+Siwa+Karma+video+in+the+halls%E2%80%A6+all+day%2C+everyday.
Photo by Gabriella Castro
Students watch the perplexing Jojo Siwa “Karma” video in the halls… all day, everyday.

As one sits in the passenger seat with the car full of friends, excitement, and energy after spending a crazy night full of teenage regrets, the only thing that can make the night even brighter is a life-changing tune blasting from the car. That life-changing tune is Jojo Siwa’s newly-released single, “Karma”.

Well, maybe not.

“Karma” is currently a controversial, and possibly life-destructive, topic around the media on whether Jojo Bobo’s new self is a new no-no. The single was released on April 5 on music platforms like YouTube, Spotify, and Apple.

For those who live under a rock and do not know who Jojo (Joelle Joanie) Siwa is, she is an American singer, dancer, actress, and internet popstar who, up until recently, uploaded content for young kids around the age of 10 through music videos, songs, and Nickelodeon shows. 

Siwa is mostly known for her appearance in the reality television show “Dance Moms”; she is also known for her bright rainbow bows and tutus which sell almost in every Walmart and Claire store. These kinds of details are what make Siwa recognizable, but now with her new appearance, fans are not sure how to feel about it.

“Boomerang”, “Kid in a Candy Store” and “I Can Make U Dance” are Siwa classics from her previous work done in 2016 through 2017. The songs mention topics like online bullying and interactions for kids to find a positive when there is a negative. Ultimately, the music is cheerful with a peppy energy.

Jojo Siwa’s “Karma”
(By Spotify)
The song is just a single, no album.

Siwa’s new single switches up entirely what was once known about her. “Karma” brings strong instrumental dynamics and great harmony. The song is catchy and the melody manages to play the right spots when listening. Considering Siwa’s past, the lyrics and darkness do not seem to apply to her. The song makes it seem like she is just trying to bring a new audience in. 

Many folks argue that the song is corny and repetitive, but once one takes the time to understand the lyrics and musical chords, they may change their opinion. The message the song talks about is how a person can be done wrong, and eventually, karma will reflect to them as they get what they deserve. This message is often heard in other songs, so Siwa is not demonstrating much originality, but with the rhythm, it is tolerable and ultimately catchy. Siwa’s vocal notes sing it in a way that can get stuck in a person’s mind and like the song.

On another note (no pun intended), the music video can be considered strange in comparison to Siwa’s old music videos. It is important to understand that Jojo Siwa is turning to adulting, and may not exactly know what that looks like. Upon starting the video, colors like black, white, blue, and red appear, creating a dark theme along with extreme makeup. The choreography is great, matching the dramatic outfits, but their strange movement and aggressiveness upon the dancers including Siwa is unnecessary. The constant change between scenery is seen causing discomfort and disrupting the audiences from liking the song completely. 

Though Siwa has been coached from a young age, she contradicts herself when asked about inspirations for her new look and music. When said in an interview with Billboard News that she “wanted to start a new genre of music” and once receiving criticism online she changed her claim to gay artists “diserv[ing] a bigger home”. Statements like this create conflict for listeners to even like a song/artist. 

Long story short, Siwa’s new single is not original and the music video is uncomfortable.  However, the show provides a catchy musical dynamic and is not as bad as it is said to be considering it is coming from Jojo Siwa.

View Comments (1)
Donate to Wildcat Chronicle
$600
$750
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of West Chicago Community High School. Your contribution will help us cover our annual website hosting costs. We appreciate your support!

About the Contributor
Gabriella Castro
Gabriella Castro, Reporter
Introducing Gabriela Castro, a sophomore from West Chicago  who, up until this year, had an extensive music career. She was involved in music throughout middle school, and participated in orchestra for eight years, but decided to take a break this year, and is now focusing on other interests. Gabriella loves animals, and has a collection of four dogs, one cat, 12 birds (yes, 12!), and three snakes. Gabriella is not sure yet what she wants to do when she graduates high school, but she knows she would like to be independent, and have her own apartment. 
Donate to Wildcat Chronicle
$600
$750
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (1)

Any comment made will go through the Wildcat Chronicle to be approved. Obscene, suggestive, vulgar, profane, threatening, disrespectful, defamatory language will not be published. Attacks made towards race, gender, sexual orientation, or creed will not be tolerated. Comments should be relevant to the article or the writer; please respect the author and the other commenters. Comments must be 300 words or less. All comments are the property of the Wildcat Chronicle after being submitted. In order to submit a comment, a valid e-mail address must be used, and the email must be verified. Impersonating another person’s name is prohibited.
All Wildcat Chronicle Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Adonis L.May 21, 2024 at 2:19 pm

    This song is just corny, the meaning is bland and isn’t really anything special. This post was great writing though.