High school inspiration helped Dwyer become principal

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High school inspiration helped Dwyer become principal

Principal Will Dwyer visits the orchestra and chats with students while answering questions.

Principal Will Dwyer visits the orchestra and chats with students while answering questions.

Photo by Leslie Najera-Rivas

Principal Will Dwyer visits the orchestra and chats with students while answering questions.

Photo by Leslie Najera-Rivas

Photo by Leslie Najera-Rivas

Principal Will Dwyer visits the orchestra and chats with students while answering questions.

By Leslie Najera-Rivas, Editor in Chief

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After a new high school principal impacted him in his high school years, Principal Will Dwyer hopes to do the same in his new role here. 

“He (the new principal) came in and did a great job. He really engaged with the community, with the student body and teachers,” Dwyer said. “I remember thinking, if you can come and be the principal and do it really well, you can impact a lot of people in a positive way.”

Dwyer has been a director, athletic director, assistant principal then director for teaching and learning for schools in Aurora. 

“I knew at some point (I would be a principal), I would probably do that in my career,” Dwyer said.

While at the school, Dwyer hopes to get to know the community.

“I believe that people remember how you make them feel a lot more than what you say to them or what you do. So if you can be kind, be mindful and purposeful with how you make people feel, I think it really has a big impact,” Dwyer said. 

For now, Dwyer is not sure of any specific goals.

“(Right now) the biggest accomplishment I have is I want to listen to the teachers, to the students, the community about what is it about West Chicago that makes us special” Dwyer said. 

Dwyer sees his future in West Chicago.

“I was here for an hour, (and) I could tell right away this would be a place that I’d be very happy at,” Dwyer said. 

While Dwyer knew his path in education, he understands not all students have a plan.

“It’s okay, don’t worry about it. Don’t worry about learning something very specific, like a particular job or skill. Worry about learning how to learn. The reality is whatever job you pick, whatever field you think you’re going to go into, may change your mind,” Dwyer said.

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