Humans of WEGO: Breaking barriers

The inspiring journey of senior Rafa Herrera Mota.
Senior Rafa Herrera Mota celebrates Senior Night with West Chicagos baseball team and his family on May 14. / Rafa Herrera Mota, estudiante de último año, celebra la Noche de último año con el equipo de béisbol de West Chicago y su familia el 14 de mayo.
Senior Rafa Herrera Mota celebrates Senior Night with West Chicago’s baseball team and his family on May 14. / Rafa Herrera Mota, estudiante de último año, celebra la Noche de último año con el equipo de béisbol de West Chicago y su familia el 14 de mayo.
Photo by Miley Pegg
Herrera has been an integral part of the baseball team since joining in 2021.

Humans of WEGO is a section of the Wildcat Chronicle focused on telling other people’s stories. Due to emphasis on language barriers and acquisition in this piece, the newspaper is publishing in both English and Spanish.

Special thanks to Miley Pegg and Dania Cureno for their contributions to this article.

Humans of WEGO es una sección de Wildcat Chronicle centrada en contar las historias de otras personas. Debido al énfasis en las barreras del idioma y la adquisición en este artículo, el periódico se publica tanto en inglés como en español.

Un agradecimiento especial a Miley PeggDania Cureno por sus contribuciones a este artículo.

###

In the bustling halls of West Chicago Community High School, one student’s story transcends borders and language barriers. Meet Rafa Herrera Mota, a beacon of resilience and determination. From arriving in the U.S. with limited English skills to now being celebrated as Student of the Month and a key player on the baseball team, Rafa’s journey embodies the spirit of relentless pursuit and the power of seizing opportunities, proving that with courage and perseverance, the sky is truly the limit—even if it just takes a plane to get there.

En los bulliciosos pasillos de West Chicago Community High School, la historia de un estudiante trasciende fronteras y barreras del idioma. Conoca a Rafa Herrera Mota, un faro de resiliencia y determinación. Desde su llegada a los EE. UU. con conocimientos limitados de inglés hasta ser celebrado como Estudiante del Mes y jugador clave en el equipo de béisbol, el viaje de Herrera encarna el espíritu de búsqueda incesante y el poder de aprovechar las oportunidades, demostrando que con coraje y perseverancia, el cielo realmente es el límite, incluso si sólo se necesita un avión para llegar allí.

(Continúe a continuación).

Herrera has been an integral part of the baseball team since joining in 2021.
Herrera volunteers in the local community during the annual Trunk or Treat event near Halloween; as an active member of National Honor Society, Herrera volunteered for more than 20 hours this past year. (Photo courtesy of Rafa Herrera Mota) / Herrera es voluntaria en la comunidad local durante el evento anual Trunk or Treat cerca de Halloween; Como miembro activo de la Sociedad Nacional de Honor, Herrera trabajó como voluntaria durante más de 20 horas el año pasado. (Foto cortesía de Rafa Herrera Mota)
Humans of WEGO: Rafa Herrera Mota

When Herrera arrived in America, he had just left much of his family in Mexico behind, and he knew very little English.

“When I met Rafa he came to take a test to determine his English level. He was very quiet and serious. I’d almost say shy. It’s not easy to leave your country, your friends and your parents, and start a new life in a foreign land with a different culture and language,” ESL teacher Mark Poulterer said.

During his first days at WEGO in 2020, his freshman year, Herrera joined the baseball team. Although communication with his teammates was a struggle, he refused to let that take away from working as hard as he could with the team during practice. 

“I [felt] uncomfortable in the beginning because I didn’t even know – if you’re saying something to me, I didn’t understand it. It was kind of hard for me. But I always focused on one thing – it was just play and have fun. And that was that,” Herrera said. 

Herrera, who was named one of just two Distinguished English Language Learners at Honors Night on May 13, in addition to being recognized as a Technology Education Student of the Year and a National Honor Society, is known throughout the high school for his perseverance. Throughout the evening, teachers and Principal Dr. Will Dwyer sung Herrera’s praises.

I have one word to describe Rafa. Grit. In my 25 years of teaching I have known few students who work as hard at everything they do as Rafa does. When he told me that he wanted to join the baseball team, I didn’t think he was serious. However, the next day he was ready for practice. He has continued to play with his whole heart since that day. Coach Walker told me, ‘I wish I had 25 Rafas on my team.’  One of his travel team coaches said, ‘Rafa would walk through a brick wall for any one of us.’  Another coach was ready to retire last year, but decided to stick it out one more year just so he could coach Rafa! This is the grit I am talking about,” Poulterer said.

Baseball played a large role in Herrera’s ability to make new friends and learn to communicate with English speakers better. 

Rafa has told me time and again that being on the baseball team helped jumpstart his English acquisition.  I think he continued to learn English words through being on the team and had a positive attitude that carried into the classroom after his experience freshman year,” Coach Charles Vokes said.

Vokes, along with Coach Greg Bodine, served as a mentor for the newcomer, and helped translate for Herrera at practices and games.

“I think it helps me a lot because I also, I wasn’t used to communicate with other people or know other people. And with baseball, I feel like it helps me to push me to know people,” Herrera  said. 

He bonded with the team early in his first season.

Rafa is the best teammate, bar none. He will run through a wall for any of his teammates. He’ll make mistakes and so will his teammates, but he will pick himself and his teammates up immediately,” Vokes said.

And through the years, Herrera has demonstrated himself to be a powerful player on the Wildcats’ Varsity baseball team. The team is currently ranked number two in the Upstate Eight Conference with a record of 12-3.

Rafa wants the ball. He wants to be the guy to help the team succeed. He has a lot of grit and perseverance when it comes to playing the game. You could also sense a different vibe when he was on the field. The team always wanted to do well for Rafa when he was on the mound,” Vokes said.

After about four years of living in America and attending school at West Chicago Community High School, Herrera is more fluent in English, but doing so has taken several years, and he still struggles sometimes. 

“At the beginning, you communicate with people, but it’s just like little words,” he said. 

While Herrera has established strong bonds with many students and staff at WEGO, his relationship with Poulterer is a particularly meaningful one. Both have learned from each other.

“Walking alongside Rafa as he has made the transition from his rancho in Mexico to his home here at West  Chicago Community High School has been a privilege for me. I have learned as much from him as I believe he has learned from me, maybe even more. I’ve taught him English and helped him join a baseball team. He has taught me that no matter what a person’s background may be, if he gives it everything he’s got, he can change his destiny,” Poulterer said.

Throughout all the hardships Herrera has faced since moving to America, he has persevered, and in the fall, he will attend Aurora University to further his education.

“He’s a great young man and it was my pleasure to know him. He is a person who has persevered against severe obstacles in his life, and a happy-go-lucky kid. I mean he’s just fantastic to be around. I just love the young man,” Bodine said.

Herrera volunteers in the local community during the annual Trunk or Treat event near Halloween; as an active member of National Honor Society, Herrera volunteered for more than 20 hours this past year. (Photo courtesy of Rafa Herrera Mota) / Herrera es voluntaria en la comunidad local durante el evento anual Trunk or Treat cerca de Halloween; Como miembro activo de la Sociedad Nacional de Honor, Herrera trabajó como voluntaria durante más de 20 horas el año pasado. (Foto cortesía de Rafa Herrera Mota)
Herrera is recognized at Honors Night for his many achievements and scholarships. / Herrera es reconocido en la Noche de Honores por sus numerosos logros y becas.
Humanos de WEGO: Rafa Herrera Mota

Cuando Herrera llegó a los Estados Unidos, acababa de dejar a gran parte de su familia en México y sabía muy poco inglés.

“Cuando conocí a Rafa vino a hacer un examen para determinar su nivel de inglés. Estaba muy tranquilo y serio. Casi diría tímido. No es fácil dejar tu país, tus amigos y tus padres, y comenzar una nueva vida en un país extranjero con una cultura e idioma diferentes”, dijo el profesor de ESL Mark Poulterer.

Durante sus primeros días en WEGO en 2020, su primer año, Herrera se unió al equipo de béisbol. Aunque la comunicación con sus compañeros de equipo fue una lucha, se negó a permitir que eso le impidiera trabajar tan duro como pudiera con el equipo durante la práctica.

“Al principio me sentí incómoda porque ni siquiera lo sabía; Si me dijiste algo, no lo entendí. Fue un poco difícil para mí. Pero siempre me centré en una cosa: jugar y divertirme. Y eso fue todo”, dijo Herrera.

Herrera, quien fue nombrado uno de los dos Estudiantes Distinguidos del Idioma Inglés en la Noche de Honores el 13 de mayo, además de ser reconocido como Estudiante del Año en Educación Tecnológica y Sociedad Nacional de Honor, es conocido en toda la escuela secundaria por su perseverancia. A lo largo de la noche, los maestros y el director, Dr. Will Dwyer, elogiaron a Herrera.

“Tengo una palabra para describir a Rafa. Arena. En mis 25 años de docencia he conocido pocos estudiantes que trabajen tan duro en todo lo que hacen como lo hace Rafa. Cuando me dijo que quería unirse al equipo de béisbol, no pensé que hablaba en serio. Sin embargo, al día siguiente estaba listo para practicar. Desde ese día sigue jugando con todo el corazón. El entrenador Walker me dijo: ‘Me gustaría tener 25 Rafas en mi equipo’. Uno de los entrenadores de su equipo de viaje dijo: ‘Rafa atravesaría una pared de ladrillos por cualquiera de nosotros’. Otro entrenador estaba a punto de retirarse el año pasado, pero decidió aguantar un año más para poder entrenar a Rafa. Esta es la determinación de la que estoy hablando”, dijo Poulterer.

El béisbol jugó un papel importante en la capacidad de Herrera para hacer nuevos amigos y aprender a comunicarse mejor con personas de habla inglesa.

“Rafa me ha dicho una y otra vez que estar en el equipo de béisbol le ayudó a mejorar su aprendizaje del inglés. Creo que continuó aprendiendo palabras en inglés mientras estaba en el equipo y tuvo una actitud positiva que trasladó al aula después de su experiencia del primer año”, dijo el entrenador Charles Vokes.

Vokes, junto con el entrenador Greg Bodine, sirvió como mentor para el recién llegado y ayudó a traducir a Herrera en prácticas y juegos.

“Creo que me ayuda mucho porque no estaba acostumbrado a comunicarme con otras personas ni a conocer otras personas tampoco. Y con el béisbol, siento que me ayuda a conocer gente”, dijo Herrera.

Se incorporó al equipo al inicio de su primera temporada.

“Rafa es el mejor compañero, sin excepción. Atravesará una pared para cualquiera de sus compañeros de equipo. Cometerá errores y sus compañeros también, pero se recuperará a sí mismo y a sus compañeros inmediatamente”, dijo Vokes.

Y a lo largo de los años, Herrera ha demostrado ser un jugador poderoso en el equipo universitario de béisbol de los Wildcats. El equipo ocupa actualmente el puesto número dos en la Conferencia Upstate Eight con un récord de 12-3.

“Rafa quiere el balón. Quiere ser la persona que ayude al equipo a tener éxito. Tiene mucho coraje y constancia a la hora de jugar. También podía sentir una vibra diferente cuando estaba en el campo. El equipo siempre quiso que Rafa se desempeñara bien cuando estaba en el montículo”, dijo Vokes.

Después de unos cuatro años de vivir en Estados Unidos y asistir a la escuela en West Chicago Community High School, Herrera habla inglés con mayor fluidez, pero lograrlo le ha llevado varios años y, a veces, todavía tiene dificultades.

“Al principio te comunicas con la gente, pero son como pequeñas palabras”, dijo.

Si bien Herrera ha formado fuertes vínculos con muchos estudiantes y personal de WEGO, su relación con Poulterer es particularmente significativa. Ambos han aprendido el uno del otro.

“Caminar junto a Rafa en su transición de su rancho en México a su casa aquí en West Chicago Community High School ha sido un privilegio para mí. He aprendido tanto de él como creo que él ha aprendido de mí, tal vez incluso más. Le enseñé inglés y lo ayudé a unirse a un equipo de béisbol. Me ha enseñado que no importa cuál sea el origen de una persona, si da todo lo que tiene, puede cambiar su destino”, dijo Poulterer.

A pesar de todas las dificultades que Herrera ha enfrentado desde que se mudó a Estados Unidos, ha perseverado y, en el otoño, asistirá a la Universidad de Aurora para continuar su educación.

“Es un gran joven y fue un placer para mí conocerlo. Es una persona que ha perseverado contra obstáculos severos en su vida, y un niño despreocupado. Quiero decir, es simplemente fantástico estar cerca de él. Simplemente Amo al joven”, dijo Bodine.

Herrera is recognized at Honors Night for his many achievements and scholarships. / Herrera es reconocido en la Noche de Honores por sus numerosos logros y becas. (Photo by Dania Cureno)
Leave a Comment
Donate to Wildcat Chronicle
$600
$750
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of West Chicago Community High School. Your contribution will help us cover our annual website hosting costs. We appreciate your support!

Donate to Wildcat Chronicle
$600
$750
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

Any comment made will go through the Wildcat Chronicle to be approved. Obscene, suggestive, vulgar, profane, threatening, disrespectful, defamatory language will not be published. Attacks made towards race, gender, sexual orientation, or creed will not be tolerated. Comments should be relevant to the article or the writer; please respect the author and the other commenters. Comments must be 300 words or less. All comments are the property of the Wildcat Chronicle after being submitted. In order to submit a comment, a valid e-mail address must be used, and the email must be verified. Impersonating another person’s name is prohibited.
All Wildcat Chronicle Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *